Presentations and other posts relating to blogging

Tuesday, March 6, 2012: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Bottom-up social web strategies make the world a brighter place
Featuring: 

At March’s Net Tuesday, we’ll be talking about how to make your social web efforts work better for you.

  • How can you use the web and social media to have the greatest impact for your nonprofit or social change venture?
  • What tools and strategies should you focus on, given limits of time and resources?
  • What lessons can be learned from other ventures who are trying to do the same?
  • What’s it mean to take a bottom-up approach to social media and web strategies?

This highly interactive program will address these questions in general, and give you the opportunity to apply lessons to your own situation. Led by Rob Kall, we’ll start out with a broad overview of how to tap the power of the web and social media to maximize your reach with various resources, including blogging, Facebook, Google Alerts, Twitter, YouTube, cross-posting to alternative media, search engine optimization (SEO), email, listserves, print, and more. Then, attendees will have a chance to consider their experience with these resources, and to pose specific questions about their own web and social media strategies, getting advice and feedback from Rob (as well as fellow attendees). This is not only a chance to find out more about some important social tools are being used in the nonprofit world, but also an opportunity to discover what you might do more effectively in your own situation.

Rob Kall founded and built OpEdNews.com, ranked by Technorati as one of the top 100 blogs in the world, overall. He consults on the use of the web and media for non-profits, corporations and authors.

Lite fare will be served. RSVP’s are appreciated (via Facebook or Meetup) for planning purposes, but not required.

Can’t make it downtown? Watch the live Internet stream! And you can participate in the conversation on Twitter, with a hashtag of #phlnet2.

Sponsored By: 
  • American Friends Service Committee
Tuesday, June 7, 2011: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
A social web sampler

Philly NetSquared is proud to present our second annual Social Web Sampler.

We’ll have fifteen 20-minute discussions on the social web-related topics that you have volunteered to lead. (Five simultaneous stations x 3 time rounds.) They are, in no particular order:

  • Making Social Media Part of Your Regular Day
  • Using a wiki for group coordination
  • Using Video for Social Media
  • Live blogging/streaming your organization’s event
  • (Audio) podcasting
  • Tracking Your Organization’s Online Reputation
  • Using WordPress to Build a Web Site
  • Drupal 7: Shiny and new; is it for you?
  • Using QR Codes to effectively promote your nonprofit’s web site
  • Video Podcasting
  • Virtual Worlds
  • What is the purpose of using social media tools
  • Video, Public Access TV, You Tube as Town Hall Forum
  • How faith-based organizations can use social media to further ministry

Plus, we’ll have one slot in the final round that attendees will select on-site — maybe for something that wasn’t covered, or maybe for something you want to talk more about.

What will the discussions be like? That’s also up to you, but they’re likely to address:

  • How are nonprofits and activists using these tools?
  • How can they be used most effectively for your nonprofit or social cause?
  • What are the latest developments and trends?

In order to retain more of the knowledge generated in these groups, we’ll have a sheet at each station for people to add additional resources (websites, books, articles, etc.) that come up during the discussion. So if you know of resources that apply to discussions you might participate in, bring ‘em along. We’ll combine these with any resources provided by the presenters, and redistribute them to all attendees after the event.

If you haven’t already done so, RSVP’s via Meetup or Facebook are appreciated for planning (but not required).

Like last year’s Sampler, this will be a highly interactive gathering with lots of shared knowledge, networking and excitement. Refreshments will be available. (NOTE: Because of the small-group format, we will NOT be streaming or recording this event.)

Thanks to the American Friends Service Committee for sponsorship.

Photo: dnnya17

Sponsored By: 
  • American Friends Service Committee
Tuesday, March 1, 2011: 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Privacy

Join us on Tuesday, March 1 (postponed from Feb. 1 by the weather) for a discussion on privacy and social change on the web.

We’ll have great speakers touching on several aspects of this issue, including:

  • Hannah Miller, formerly of the Media and Democracy Coalition, on privacy and online organizing for social change. Is it better to push for privacy and anonymity, or transparency and accountability? How do people use social media differently when they have privacy and when they’re aware that they don’t? Which is better for building effective online communities organizing around social change issues?
  • Ivan Boothe, of Rootwork.org, on organizing communities in which anonymity is important. How can human rights activists challenging their governments, people targeted with violence because of their identities, or those organizing abuse survivors still engage in blogging and social media?
  • Mario Rodriguez, a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication in the area of social network privacy, on how we as individuals and organizations can be aware of the privacy implications of how we use the social web. How can we be smart about the amount of data we allow for-profit companies like Google and Facebook to have access to about our organizations and campaigns? Is “the age of privacy over,” as Mark Zuckerberg has said? Should social advocacy nonprofits take a side in this debate?
  • Andrew Sather, of Jenkins Law Library, on privacy and your organization’s presence on the web. Does our nonprofit website need a privacy policy? What should it be? How can we be smart about how third-party tools such as Google Analytics might impact the privacy of our visitors?

In addition to the presentations, there will be ample time for questions and discussion.

Who should come to this event?

  • Nonprofit staffers interested in learning more about the privacy implications of their use of the social web and the Internet.
  • Online activists and organizers who want to know how to use the social web without compromising the safety of the communities in which they work.
  • Techies who are interested in supporting social good and social change campaigns, and helping nonprofits and activists achieve their goals.

Come with your questions, ideas and comments about privacy and social change on the web!

More about the presenters

Hannah Miller is a writer, consultant, and thinker on topics involving written words, sounds, still images, and moving pictures, in their transit over phone and cable lines, through the air, and to your radios, TV boxes, cell phones, etc — in other words, the media. She has been a general assignment and beat reporter, campaigned for progressive candidates, written puppet shows and edited books, worked as a media-policy advocate at the Media and Democracy Coalition, and drawn what might be the world’s only cartoon on net neutrality. Contact: hmiller430@gmail.com or 215-888-8036.

Ivan Boothe is the creative director of Rootwork.org, working with nonprofits and social change groups, developing websites and doing online strategy around advocacy, fundraising and member engagement. He is a community organizer with Casino-Free Philadelphia and the online communications coordinator for the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He has experience in a number of social change and nonprofit groups, including co-founding the Genocide Intervention Network.

Mario Rodriguez is an Annenberg doctoral candidate specializing in social network privacy. His dissertation is a study of Facebook privacy among college seniors as they transition to the workplace. Mario received his M.A. from Annenberg (2008), and his B.A. from New College (2001). He also holds an M.A. in Journalism from The University of Florida (2006), and has worked in journalism, media research and government. You can read his blog at www.visualinquiry.org.

Andrew Sather is a self-described IT and Information Science nerd. By day he is the Assistant Director of Technology Services at Jenkins Law Library. His New Year’s resolution is to start (and regularly contribute to) a blog, which he’s mildly embarrassed to share with you here.

Live online webcast

If you’re not located in Philadelphia, or just can’t make it to the event in person, be sure to follow along on our live webcast. We’ll also have a Twitter backchannel set up using the hashtag #phlnet2, and we invite those at the event and those following remotely to comment and submit questions through Twitter.

The event begins at 6:00 PM in Philadelphia, with time for conversations and networking. The programmatic portion of the evening, along with the live online webcast, will begin at 6:30 PM Eastern. Learn more about the live webcast.

Image: Flickr user opensourceway

Sponsored By: 
  • American Friends Service Committee
Tuesday, February 1, 2011: 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Privacy

Event postponed to March 1 due to weather

This event has been postponed. Please take a look at the updated event listing for Tuesday, March 1.

What follows is the original event listing — but please note the event will not be taking place on Feb. 1. See you in March!


Join us on Tuesday, Feb. 1 for a discussion on privacy and social change on the web.

We’ll have four great speakers touching on several aspects of this issue, including:

  • Hannah Miller, formerly of the Media and Democracy Coalition, on privacy and online organizing for social change. Is it better to push for privacy and anonymity, or transparency and accountability? How do people use social media differently when they have privacy and when they’re aware that they don’t? Which is better for building effective online communities organizing around social change issues?
  • Ivan Boothe, of Rootwork.org, on organizing communities in which anonymity is important. How can human rights activists challenging their governments, people targeted with violence because of their identities, or those organizing abuse survivors still engage in blogging and social media?
  • Mario Rodriguez, a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication in the area of social network privacy, on how we as individuals and organizations can be aware of the privacy implications of how we use the social web. How can we be smart about the amount of data we allow for-profit companies like Google and Facebook to have access to about our organizations and campaigns? Is “the age of privacy over,” as Mark Zuckerberg has said? Should social advocacy nonprofits take a side in this debate?
  • Andrew Sather, of Jenkins Law Library, on privacy and your organization’s presence on the web. Does our nonprofit website need a privacy policy? What should it be? How can we be smart about how third-party tools such as Google Analytics might impact the privacy of our visitors?

In addition to the presentations, there will be ample time for questions and discussion.

Who should come to this event?

  • Nonprofit staffers interested in learning more about the privacy implications of their use of the social web and the Internet.
  • Online activists and organizers who want to know how to use the social web without compromising the safety of the communities in which they work.
  • Techies who are interested in supporting social good and social change campaigns, and helping nonprofits and activists achieve their goals.

Come with your questions, ideas and comments about privacy and social change on the web!

More about the presenters

Hannah Miller is a writer, consultant, and thinker on topics involving written words, sounds, still images, and moving pictures, in their transit over phone and cable lines, through the air, and to your radios, TV boxes, cell phones, etc — in other words, the media. She has been a general assignment and beat reporter, campaigned for progressive candidates, written puppet shows and edited books, worked as a media-policy advocate at the Media and Democracy Coalition, and drawn what might be the world’s only cartoon on net neutrality. Contact: hmiller430@gmail.com or 215-888-8036.

Ivan Boothe is the creative director of Rootwork.org, working with nonprofits and social change groups, developing websites and doing online strategy around advocacy, fundraising and member engagement. He is a community organizer with Casino-Free Philadelphia and the online communications coordinator for the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He has experience in a number of social change and nonprofit groups, including co-founding the Genocide Intervention Network.

Mario Rodriguez is an Annenberg doctoral candidate specializing in social network privacy. His dissertation is a study of Facebook privacy among college seniors as they transition to the workplace. Mario received his M.A. from Annenberg (2008), and his B.A. from New College (2001). He also holds an M.A. in Journalism from The University of Florida (2006), and has worked in journalism, media research and government. You can read his blog at www.visualinquiry.org.

Andrew Sather is a self-described IT and Information Science nerd. By day he is the Assistant Director of Technology Services at Jenkins Law Library. His New Year’s resolution is to start (and regularly contribute to) a blog, which he’s mildly embarrassed to share with you here.

Live online webcast

If you’re not located in Philadelphia, or just can’t make it to the event in person, be sure to follow along on our live webcast. We’ll also have a Twitter backchannel set up using the hashtag #phlnet2, and we invite those at the event and those following remotely to comment and submit questions through Twitter.

The event begins at 6:00 PM in Philadelphia, with time for conversations and networking. The programmatic portion of the evening, along with the live online webcast, will begin at 6:30 PM Eastern. Learn more about the live webcast.

Image: Flickr user opensourceway

Tuesday, October 5, 2010: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Youth and Digital Empowerment

Join us for October’s Net Tuesday event, Youth and Digital Empowerment.  We’ll be meeting on Tuesday, October 5 at the Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, starting at 6:00 PM.

Practitioners in the field of youth and digital media will share their work empowering youth to identify issues important in their communities and to share their message through digital and social media.  They will share examples of their projects and address challenges including access to technology, privacy concerns and more.

David Cooper Moore will talk about Temple University’s Powerful Voices for Kids program. The mission of the Powerful Voices for Kids program is to strengthen children’s abilities to think for themselves, communicate effectively using language and technology tools, and use their powerful voices to contribute to the quality of life in their families, their schools, their communities, and the world.  He will speak about the program itself with a focus on curriculum and pedagogical approaches to youth media.

Laura Deutch is the founder of Messages in MotionMIM offers youth participants the opportunity to produce short video postcards that communicate personal and social messages about their diverse life experiences. As the van travels through the city, the stories inspire, educate and provoke participants from different communities to learn from one another.  She will present an overview of the program and focus on building community partnerships as youth and youth-serving organizations learn from each other’s projects.  (Plus, a tour inside the MIM van!)

Sam Reed is the founder of Sriii Consulting and a blogger for the Philadelphia Public School Notebook.  He provides support to schools and youth-serving organizations around media literacy and arts education integration. He will share his curriculum unit, MySpace in Democracy, that conducts an inquiry on the risks and rights youth develop and maintain online.

Who should attend?

  • Youth-serving organizations seeking to expand their digital media programs
  • Nonprofits and government agencies committed to engaging young people
  • Media makers
  • Social entrepreneurs
  • Anybody who wants to learn more about, or share their experiences of, the fast-growing and powerful force of youth and digital media.

Like last month, we’ll be streaming this event live on the Internet, and supporting a Twitter backchannel (via #phlnet2).  So, tell your friends outside of Philadelphia (or others who can’t attend in person) so they can participate in the event remotely.  More information will be available on our website: http://phillynetsquared.org.

But come down in person if you can.  Lite fare will be provided, and it will be fun and interesting.  RSVP’s via Meetup or Facebook are appreciated, but not required.

 


We very gratefully acknowledge our sponsors for this event:  The Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance and the American Friends Service Committee, without whose generous support, these events would not be possible.

Sponsored By: 
  • American Friends Service Committee
  • Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance
Tuesday, August 3, 2010: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Connecting the dots

Our discussion will be led by Nicole Newman of Newman Networks, who will review some key social media principles and introduce a way to “connect the dots” of your social media strategy. Then several local nonprofits and activists will describe their own social media experiences, and we’ll help them “connect the dots” themselves.

This informative and highly interactive session is for anybody who wants to learn and share a fresh approach to advancing their nonprofit or social cause with social media.

Nicole Newman is a technology specialist helping organizations create executable plans for profitable results by increasing networking opportunities and efficient IT driven marketing solutions. She has worked with hundreds of organizations in four short years (online and offline) interweaving networks to create a better Philadelphia community. You can find out more about her on LinkedIn or Facebook.

We gratefully acknowledge our sponsor this month, dice.com, “the career hub for tech insiders”, who will be providing food, as well as giving away “merchandice” for people to enjoy.

Our venue

Jenkins Law Library is located on the 12th floor of the 833 Chestnut Street building, directly across from the Ben. Franklin. Use the Chestnut Street entrance. Please tell security that you are attending the Net Tuesday event at Jenkins. You will be required to sign in. The elevators unload on the 12th floor in front of Jenkins’ main doors. There will be a devilishly handsome young man behind the front desk to direct you to the event.

Looking ahead

For Net Tuesday, September 7, we’ll be having a discussion about the state of social networking with Deanna Zandt, author of Share This: How You Will Change the World with Social Networking. Mark the date, and check out this terrific book!

Sponsored By: 
  • Dice.com
Tuesday, May 4, 2010: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Social Web Sampler
Featuring: 

It’s our anniversary!  Philly NetSquared started holding monthly Net Tuesday gatherings of people “interested in using the social web for social change” back in May, 2008.  And, for our second anniversary, we’re going to hold a “Social Web Sampler”.

 

The Sampler will be an opportunity to address how various social web tools can help YOUR nonprofit or social action cause.  Blogs.  Wikis.  Mapping.  Facebook.  Podcasts.  Photo sharing.  RSS.  Videoblogging.  Mobile applications.  Twitter.  Tagging.  LinkedIn.  Digg.  Meetup.  And so much MORE!

  •  How are nonprofits and activists using these tools?
  •   How can they be used most effectively for YOUR nonprofit or social cause?
  •   What are the latest developments and trends?

The evening will be divided into two major sections: Small Groups and Large Group.

 

First, we’ll have time-limited, small group discussions around a specific social web tool or topic and how it applies to social change or the nonprofit world.  Which particular social web tools will be discussed, and who will facilitate those discussions?  That’s up to you.  You’re all invited to lead a discussion.  Maybe you’re an expert in using one (or more) of these tools.  But you don’t have to be an expert.  Perhaps you are just interested in a tool or topic and want to enjoy a discussion focused on it.  YOUR interests and passion will shape the agenda.

 

We plan to have three 15-20 minute discussion periods, each with 4-5 simultaneous groups, resulting in a total of 12-15 small group discussions focused on a particular social web tool or topic.  Each small group discussion will have a computer available for real-time demonstrations (and wireless is available).  Small group topics people have already volunteered to lead include:

  • Twitter (Sara Cederberg & Warren Allen)
  • Podcasting (Steve Lubetkin)
  • Facebook (Judah Ferst)
  • Blogging (Ivan Boothe)
  • Video web conferencing (Tim Siftar)
  • Facebook (Sara Cederberg)
  • Monitoring social media impact (Cliff Stevens)
  • WordPress (Jim Wurster)
  • Flickr (Ralph Medley & Tony Heriza)
  • Content management systems (Nate Gasser)

If you’re interested in leading a group discussion, please sign up here: http://tinyurl.com/SocialWebSampler.  Please sign up before midnight on Sunday, May 2 to be sure to secure a slot.

 

Then, after our thinking has been stimulated by these small groups, we’ll regather into a large group, and you’ll have the opportunity to enjoy the collective wisdom of the entire crowd by asking about applying these tools and strategies to your own situation.

 

This will be a highly interactive gathering with lots of shared knowledge and excitement.  Lite fare will be provided if you’re hungry.  Hope to see you there.  RSVP’s via Meetup or Facebook (links above) are appreciated.

 

 

 

We gratefully acknowledge the American Friends Service Committee, who sponsored our kick-off event two years ago, and has graciously offered to sponsor this anniversary event also.

Sponsored By: 
  • American Friends Service Committee
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